Release Details

LABEL Inside Out
RELEASED ON 3/25/2016
GENRES Stoner
  • It’s as comfortable as an old shoe, but it’s also so well done that it’s difficult to criticize the approach.


Spiritual Beggars

Sunrise to Sundown

posted on 4/2016   By: Dave Schalek

The Michael Amott-led Spiritual Beggars really upped its game in 2013 with the release of its eighth album, Earth Blues. It was a near perfect blend of riffs, macho vocals, an analog vibe, and the ‘70s shtick updated for the 21st century. Not to mention the songs ain’t half bad either, with nary a weak track to be had, frankly. I’m harping on about this because most bands in Spiritual Beggars’ shoes would be happy to just be solid and consistent by the time of their eighth album, if they’ve even managed to get that far, especially when playing music within a niche genre. There’s no more ground to be broken.

It’s that sort of attitude that seems to be working to Spiritual Beggars’ advantage, because although no new ground is broken, Sunrise To Sundown continues right where Earth Blues left off. The same ballsy, blues-based riffing and keyboard melodies abound, along with Apollo Papathanasio’s distinctive vocals, giving Spiritual Beggars its nearly trademarked sound. It’s as comfortable as an old shoe, but it’s also so well done that it’s difficult to criticize the approach.

Take the opening title track below. A good riff to get things going, Papathanasio’s vocals anchoring the sound, the keyboards to accompany the chorus – you name it, all very slickly done, and still catchy as all get out.

"Been there, done that" is all over the album, but it's all broken up nicely by a few quieter numbers interspersed within the rockers. You could practically see the rainbow rising over the horizon as you listen to “Lonely Freedom" as Spiritual Beggars gives your imagination plenty of food to work with. Closer “Southern Star” has a nice solo with Amott briefly going into NWOBHM territory and a piano melody.

If you’re still reading by this point, it probably means that you’re already fan of Spiritual Beggars and have really liked the last few albums. You’ll like Sunrise To Sundown, too. If not…. well, then.