All posts by Zach Duvall

Last Rites Co-Owner; Senior Editor; Obnoxious overuser of baseball metaphors.

Nachash – Phantasmal Triunity Review

A lot of extreme metal isn’t particularly, well, extreme. Melody, sheen, and progressive elements might end up dominating, or maybe there’s a tendency to lift a bunch of NWOBHM riffs, leaving some screeching dude as

Progenie Terrestre Pura – starCross Review

FAST RITES: because sometimes brevity is fundamental. As they did after their first LP, Italy’s industrial/black metal/sci-fi wizards Progenie Terrestre Pura have followed up the monstrous oltreLuna with an EP. But in contrast to the

With The End In Mind – Unraveling; Arising Review

Originally released independently in 2016, Unraveling; Arising is the debut full length of Olympia’s With the End in Mind. The project is the sole vision – if not quite sole execution – of Alex Freilich,

Khanus – Flammarion Review

Finland’s Khanus is a very strange band, and not necessarily for the reason most of us westerns likely think–that snicker-friendly name that has no conveniently available translation. No, Finland’s Khanus is a strange band to

Blood Worship – Death’s Omnipotence Review

FAST RITES: because sometimes brevity is fundamental. Sweden’s Blood Worship comes to you from the mind, guitar, and voice of Martin Andersson, also of Astrophobos. And if you’ve spent time with that band, you’ll know

Urfaust – The Constellatory Practice Review

If you want to get all scientific about it, music is just physics. “Just physics,” of course, is a silly statement, as physics is the vast study of about everything, and the tiny vibrations that

Deathstorm – Reaping What Is Left Review

FAST RITES: because sometimes brevity is fundamental. Reaping What Is Left, the third full length from Austrian thrashers Deathstorm, sounds almost exactly like Slayer. And not the clearly-influenced-by-but-bringing-a-little-something-new type of sounding almost exactly like Slayer,

Uada – Cult Of A Dying Sun Review

Uada comes to us from Portland, but instead of sounding like 1,000 other Pacific Northwest black metal bands, the particular brand offered on sophomore album Cult of a Dying Sun sounds pulled from 90s Sweden.