Tag: Thrash

Diamonds & Rust: Death Angel – Act III

[Artwork by Adrian Stubican] Finally hauling Death Angel into the Diamonds & Rust ring and electing to award sacred gem status to an album other than The Ultra-Violence somehow feels… Unseemly? Misguided? Crazier than a

Draghkar – At The Crossroads Of Infinity Review

Blackened thrash is a strange beast. It was certainly, in retrospect, present before the second wave of black metal, but it never really found that tag until after black metal became an established, definitive style.

The Third Kind – Man Vs Earth Review

[Artwork drawn by Rich Muller and painted by Frankie Accardi] Metal, punk and hardcore were clearly crossing lines long before the term “crossover” became a common part of our vernacular. For example, it wasn’t at

10s Essentials – Volume Ten

As the virtuous musketeers of Dark Angel once pronounced, “We Have Arrived”—the tenth and final installment of our 100 Essential Albums of the 2010s is here, and with it comes all the goodness associated with

Cryptic Shift – Visitations From Enceladus Review

If you wander over to the Bandcamp page for Cryptic Shift’s full length debut Visitations from Enceladus, you’ll easily glean the expected bits of information: genre tags (death, thrash, progressive, technical, etc.), location (Leeds, UK),

Shards Of Humanity – Cold Logic Review

It says right up there by our logo: “Generally impressed with riffs.” Thus, I am generally impressed with Shards Of Humanity. It’s been almost six years since the first album from this Memphis-born four-piece, a

Witches Hammer – Damnation Is My Salvation Review

Fast Rites: because sometimes brevity is fundamental. In the earliest days of thrash, a great prophecy was foretold. It spoke of a day when the False had inherited the Earth and roamed freely, spewing forth

[Cover art by Rheanna Fancypants]

Ritual Dictates – Give In To Despair Review

I’m sure that when Ash Pearson and Justin Hagberg chose to name their debut album Give In To Despair, it probably just sounded really metal and maybe tied some lyrical themes together. But here we