All posts by Dan Obstkrieg

Happily committed to the foolish pursuit of words about sounds. Not actually a dinosaur.

Tsjuder – Legion Helvete Review

Sweet wind-surfing Moses, has it really been seven years since these Norsk bastards dropped Desert Northern Hell? Now, hold on, before you get your fact-checking nerd rage in full flush, it’s mostly a rhetorical question,

Bosse-De-Nage – II Review

The fault-lines between a traditional and an experimental take on a particular style of music are usually quite clear. There’s little chance one would mistake Cannibal Corpse for Portal, or Immortal for The Axis of

KEN Mode – Venerable Review

Since the clamoring of the barbarians at the gates has become increasingly indignant about the tardiness of this KEN Mode review, let me tell you a little story about why you all should be utterly

Reverse Polarity – Take The A ‘Trane

Welcome, intrepid reader, to the first in what will be an ongoing editorial series highlighting albums and artists well outside the realm of heavy metal that might still make the seasoned headbanger pause their recently-unearthed

Azarath – Blasphemers’ Maledictions Review

Long-running Polish death metal outfit Azarath has returned to bloody action with fifth album Blasphemers’ Maledictions. The sound may be quintessential Polish death metal, but Azarath plays it with an intensely occult black metal focus

Myrath – Tales Of The Sands Review

Tunisia’s principal metal export Myrath is back with another album that wallows in a bland lather of Orphaned Land’s Middle Eastern progressive metal and fairly standard if muscular power metal. The ripping neoclassical/medieval power metal

Atriarch – Forever The End Review

Forever the End is a superbly-realized first effort from Portland, Oregon’s Atriarch. Summoning a thick, melancholy doom metal that drinks deeply from the wells of black metal and ‘proper’ gothic rock (think Bauhaus, not corsets),

Beneath Oblivion – From Man To Dust Review

From Man To Dust is the second album from Cincinnati, Ohio’s Beneath Oblivion, and it offers more than ample evidence that the Rust Belt remains a potent source of crippling rage and desperation. All in