Goatsnake -1/Dog Days Split CD Review

Originally written by Drew Ailes

Oh Southern Lord, you big beautiful lovers of all things doom and stoner oriented. Sometimes I don’t know what I’d do without you consistently giving us fantastic music. Re-enter Goatsnake, a profound blend of doom and stoner rock, featuring members of The Obsessed and Acid King. Formed in 1999, they only lasted a short while – disbanding in 2002. Apparently they couldn’t keep away too long as they reformed in 2004 to deliver the EP, Trampled Under HoofDog Days is actually a rerelease of an out of print five song EP, giving those of us who missed it the first time around a second chance.

With the reverberating and bluesy vocals of former Scream(!) vocalist, Pete Stahl, and the sludgy guitars penetrating your ears, Dog Days shows where it all began. Although the music is generally upbeat, it still feels dark and gloomy. “Long Gone” almost sounds like a Cathedral track from The Ethereal Mirror, with different vocals. The occasional inclusion of keyboards is a nice added touch on tracks like “Heartbreaker”, a well-executed cover originally done by Free, but I’m thankful they’re only on that song. “Raw Curtains” is a vocal-less droning 7:30 track, placing a lot of emphasis on the fact that they’re doom by playing the same lethargic guitar riff again and again while sounds phase in and out in the background. It’s the sort of song you end up forgetting you’re listening to and when you tune back in, you suddenly feel really lost and confused as you’re wondering what you just did for the last five minutes. Something I’m always fond of – losing time to music.

Aside from “Raw Curtains” on Dog Days, Goatsnake play relatively balanced groove-laden and slightly doomy stoner rock. Although they do stray into the more sparse and noise-related territory, they generally stick to their rock roots, and when they don’t, it’s still excellent. Definitely a good listen for people who can tolerate all styles of doom, as Dog Days showcases Goatsnake’s songwriting talent in many forms. Otherwise it comes as a must have for anyone whose interested in hearing the origins of one of the more influential doom/stoner acts around. Oh Southern Lord, you big beautiful lovers of all things doom and stoner oriented. Sometimes I don’t know what I’d do without you consistently giving us fantastic music. Re-enter Goatsnake, a profound blend of doom and stoner rock, featuring members of The Obsessed and Acid King. Formed in 1999, they only lasted a short while – disbanding in 2002. Apparently they couldn’t keep away too long as they reformed in 2004 to deliver the EP, Trampled Under Hoof. Dog Days is actually a rerelease of an out of print five song EP, giving those of us who missed it the first time around a second chance.  With the reverberating and bluesy vocals of former Scream(!) vocalist, Pete Stahl, and the sludgy guitars penetrating your ears, Dog Days shows where it all began. Although the music is generally upbeat, it still feels dark and gloomy. “Long Gone” almost sounds like a Cathedral track from The Ethereal Mirror, with different vocals. The occasional inclusion of keyboards is a nice added touch on tracks like “Heartbreaker”, a well-executed cover originally done by Free, but I’m thankful they’re only on that song. “Raw Curtains” is a vocal-less droning 7:30 track, placing a lot of emphasis on the fact that they’re doom by playing the same lethargic guitar riff again and again while sounds phase in and out in the background. It’s the sort of song you end up forgetting you’re listening to and when you tune back in, you suddenly feel really lost and confused as you’re wondering what you just did for the last five minutes. Something I’m always fond of – losing time to music.

Aside from “Raw Curtains” on Dog Days, Goatsnake play relatively balanced groove-laden and slightly doomy stoner rock. Although they do stray into the more sparse and noise-related territory, they generally stick to their rock roots, and when they don’t, it’s still excellent. Definitely a good listen for people who can tolerate all styles of doom, as Dog Days showcases Goatsnake’s songwriting talent in many forms. Otherwise it comes as a must have for anyone whose interested in hearing the origins of one of the more influential doom/stoner acts around.

Posted by Old Guard

The retired elite of LastRites/MetalReview.

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