Bane – The Note Review

Originally written by Drew Ailes

There don’t seem to be too many hardcore bands that “true” fans of the genre as well as new kids just delving into the sound can agree on. Hence why Massachusetts’ Bane are able to draw the crowds and work them into such an explosive frenzy. To anyone who hasn’t witnessed the spectacle of one of their shows, it’s definitely an exciting and uplifting experience that I’d love to see replicated, yet I’m aware of the unlikelihood of such a thing occurring. In any case, they’re one of the more known bands that’s refused to adapt their style to mainstream popularity. While I’d never expect them to alter their bread-and-butter, so to say, The Note shows more similarity with their older work.

To the delight of some and dismay of others, the familiar zealous vocals and lyrics of Aaron Bedard are still as uncompromising and correctly timed as before. Bane are an undeniably sincere band, and the passion most importantly bleeds into the music, right down to the gang-shouts. One of the things that attracts so many people to their music is unarguably the fine balance between the straightforward songwriting, but also how they insert just enough complexity into their guitarwork. Roaring out of the gates, the purposeful “Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda” sets the stage with a driving rhythm and thick riffing. They continue on their course but alter it slightly on “Hoods Up”, which is fairly dark in comparison with the rest of the album, however, the bright transition into the bridge is one of the more stellar songwriting moments on the album. “Don’t Go” displays a brilliant use of harmonics before “Wasted On The Youth” floors you with great progressions and memorable build ups.

The saddest thing about The Note is its short playing time of only 28 minutes, but that’s to be expected. Nevertheless, it’s another fine chapter in the book of Bane, sure to please every single one of their fans. If you haven’t heard them and dismissed them as being too this/that, I strongly urge you to check them out in whatever form you can find them. Then maybe you’ll finally understand why everywhere you go, you’re surrounded by a sea of hooded zip-up sweatshirts, adorned with the name of the man who broke Batman’s back. You’ll find yourself hooked, probably. There don’t seem to be too many hardcore bands that “true” fans of the genre as well as new kids just delving into the sound can agree on. Hence why Massachusetts’ Bane are able to draw the crowds and work them into such an explosive frenzy. To anyone who hasn’t witnessed the spectacle of one of their shows, it’s definitely an exciting and uplifting experience that I’d love to see replicated, yet I’m aware of the unlikelihood of such a thing occurring. In any case, they’re one of the more known bands that’s refused to adapt their style to mainstream popularity. While I’d never expect them to alter their bread-and-butter, so to say, The Note shows more similarity with their older work. To the delight of some and dismay of others, the familiar zealous vocals and lyrics of Aaron Bedard are still as uncompromising and correctly timed as before. Bane are an undeniably sincere band, and the passion most importantly bleeds into the music, right down to the gang-shouts. One of the things that attracts so many people to their music is unarguably the fine balance between the straightforward songwriting, but also how they insert just enough complexity into their guitarwork. Roaring out of the gates, the purposeful “Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda” sets the stage with a driving rhythm and thick riffing. They continue on their course but alter it slightly on “Hoods Up”, which is fairly dark in comparison with the rest of the album, however, the bright transition into the bridge is one of the more stellar songwriting moments on the album. “Don’t Go” displays a brilliant use of harmonics before “Wasted On The Youth” floors you with great progressions and memorable build ups.

The saddest thing about The Note is its short playing time of only 28 minutes, but that’s to be expected. Nevertheless, it’s another fine chapter in the book of Bane, sure to please every single one of their fans. If you haven’t heard them and dismissed them as being too this/that, I strongly urge you to check them out in whatever form you can find them. Then maybe you’ll finally understand why everywhere you go, you’re surrounded by a sea of hooded zip-up sweatshirts, adorned with the name of the man who broke Batman’s back. You’ll find yourself hooked, probably.

Posted by Old Guard

The retired elite of LastRites/MetalReview.

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